Physical comorbidities of dementia by Susan Kurrle

Cover of: Physical comorbidities of dementia | Susan Kurrle

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Physiopathology,
  • Complications,
  • Dementia,
  • Therapy

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Book details

StatementSusan Kurrle, Henry Brodaty, Roseanne Hogarth
ContributionsBrodaty, Henry, Hogarth, Roseanne
The Physical Object
Paginationp. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25283222M
ISBN 109781107648265
LC Control Number2012013673

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Physical Comorbidities of Dementia provides practical explanations and solutions to help all healthcare professionals to improve care for people with dementia. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App.

Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer. Physical Comorbidities of Dementia describes how these may present and gives detailed information and evidence-based recommendations on Physical comorbidities of dementia book to recognise and manage these conditions.

Written by clinicians, each chapter deals with a separate condition accompanied by Cited by: Physical Comorbidities of Dementia describes how these may present and gives detailed information and evidence-based recommendations on how to recognise and manage these conditions.

Written by clinicians, each chapter deals with a separate condition accompanied by. The contents of this booklet are based on the medical text ‘ Physical Comorbidities of Dementia’, co-written by Professor Susan Kurrle, Professor Henry Brodaty and Mrs Roseanne Hogarth.

Professor Susan Kurrle, Professor Henry Brodaty, Roseanne Hogarth and Arnick Gupta Northern Sydney Local Health District December An overview of dementia.

Dementia is reaching epidemic proportions. To date treatment has focused on cognitive and behavioural symptoms and their management, but the physical side has been neglected.

Physical comorbidity is extremely common in people with dementia and leads to excess disability and reduced quality of life for the affected person and their family. about comorbidity. This book, Physical Comorbidities of Dementia is the most recent of the reviews whose production the Association has stimulated – the pre-vious reviews dealt with physical illness and schizophrenia (Leucht et al.), intellec-tual disability and ill Health (O’Hara, McCarthy and Bouras) and physical.

Book by Dr Susan Kurrle, Professor Henry Brodaty and Ms Roseanne Hogarth. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pages, incl. index. Book Review: Physical Comorbidities of Dementia 03 Jun A geriatrician, a psychiatrist and a nurse (no this isn't the start of a joke!) have written a useful review outlining what is known about nine medical conditions that occur more often in people with dementia (PWD) than in other people.

Dementia is commonly associated with co-morbidities. Co-morbidities in dementia may be mistaken for the symptoms of dementia. Co-morbidities in dementia associated with poor outcomes and impaired quality of life. Dementia overshadows recognition of co-morbidities. Based on the book Physical Comorbidities of Dementia, the resource consists of three modules, covering nine comorbidities: falls; delirium; weight loss and malnutrition; epilepsy; frailty; sleep disorders; oral disease; vision dysfunction; incontinence.

Physical restraint use and falls in nursing homes: a comparison between residents with and without dementia. American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease & Other Dementias, 26, 44 – Mirolsky-Scala, G.

and Kraemer, T. Physical Comorbidities of Dementia describes how these may present and gives detailed information and evidence-based recommendations on how to recognise and manage these conditions.

Written by clinicians, each chapter deals with a separate condition accompanied by Brand: Cambridge University Press. Physical Comorbidities of Dementia provides practical explanations and solutions to help all healthcare professionals to improve care for people with dementia.

Discover the world's research Buy Physical Comorbidities of Dementia 1 by Kurrle, Susan (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Susan Kurrle.

Book contents; Dementia Rehabilitation. Dementia Rehabilitation. Evidence-Based Interventions and Clinical Recommendations. Pages Chapter 12 - Physical comorbidities of dementia: Recognition and rehabilitation. Author links open overlay panel Susan Kurrle.

Show more. https. There are a number of physical health conditions (physical comorbidities) that occur more commonly in people with late-life dementia than in the general population of the same age. This chapter provides an overview of these physical conditions which accompany and complicate dementia.

This book is designed to guide all physicians in long-term care, in- and outpatient settings who work with elders with co-current dementia and medical comorbidities, with recommendations for functional management, medications, and common conditions impacting of cognitive dysfunction.

Dementia Rehabilitation is a resource for health and social professionals, service planners, policy makers, and academics. The book makes a compelling case for rehabilitation for people with dementia, including the views of people with dementia and the research evidence.

Physical Comorbidities of Dementia describes how these may present and gives detailed information and evidence-based recommendations on how to recognise and manage these conditions.

Written by clinicians, each chapter deals with a separate condition accompanied by Author: Susan Kurrle, Henry Brodaty, Roseanne Hogarth. It is now recognized that physical functioning is affected in people living with dementia.

Impairments include poorer reaction time, weaker muscle strength, reduced coordination, and impaired balance. Along with cognitive impairment, physical impairments contribute to increased risk of adverse events such as falls and fractures.

There are a number of physical health conditions (physical comorbidities) that occur more commonly in people with late-life dementia than in the general population of the same age.

The comorbidities considered in this study are conditions that: can increase the risk of dementia such as hypertension, coronary heart disease (CHD) and diabetes. The APA Handbook of Dementia addresses assessment, comorbidity, evaluation, and treatment of various forms of dementia.

The handbook reviews common dementias including Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and other less common dementias. urther declines in physical function that may necessitate costly institutionalization.

This study evaluates how multimorbidity and dementia impact both self-selected gait speed and Timed Up and Go (TUG) in this population. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional design. Sociodemographic information, physical function, comorbidity data, and dementia status on PACE participants were.

Yet, physical comorbidities are reported as common in people with dementia and have been shown to lead to increased disability and reduced quality of life for the affected person and their carer. Dementia is most frequently associated with older people who often present with other medical conditions, known as co-morbidities.

PHYSICAL COMORBIDITIES OF DEMENTIA: AN INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM Translating dementia research into practice Conclusions An evaluation study examining the effectiveness of an interprofessional education series, for acute ward staff to increase their knowledge of the physical comorbidities of dementia.

Background Results Results. Comorbidity and dementia: a mixed-method study on improving health care for people with dementia (CoDem). Health Serv Deliv Res 4(8) In a separate report, the additional cost of several common comorbidities of dementia was estimated by comparing the cost of care for a person with dementia and the comorbidity as opposed to only the comorbidity.

The most common comorbidities in dementia are high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and depression.

The existence of different additional conditions in PwD creates complex challenges for health care providers, PwD, and their informal caregivers. The study, “The impact of comorbidity on the quality of life of people with dementia: findings from the IDEAL study,” was published in the journal Age and Ageing.

The existence of multiple chronic diseases in a person, called comorbidities, can influence degrees of disability and are associated with poorer health-related quality of life. This book is designed to guide all physicians in long-term care, in- and outpatient settings who work with elders with co-current dementia and medical comorbidities.

Chapters cover a wide range of ch. Physical Comorbidities of Dementia provides practical explanations and solutions to help all healthcare professionals to improve care for people with dementia. $ $ Similar ebooks. Fishpond Australia, Physical Comorbidities of Dementia by Susan (University of Sydney) Kurrle Henry (University of New South Wales) BrodatyBuy.

Books online: Physical Comorbidities of Dementia,  Evidence suggests that amongst people with dementia there is a high prevalence of comorbid medical conditions and related complaints.

The presence of dementia may complicate clinical care for other conditions and undermine a patient’s ability to manage a chronic condition. The aim of this study was to scope the extent, range and nature of research activity around dementia and comorbidity.

Physical activity has been cited as a potential symptomatic treatment option for people living with dementia. At present, much of the research concerning physical activity and dementia considers older adults, and there are several review articles summarising the evidence in this area.

Less is known about physical activity for younger people with dementia, despite the marked differences in. The presence of common physical comorbidities, their demographic and clinical correlates and impact on functioning was assessed in patients with schizophrenia.

The patients had a mean age of ± yr with mean duration of illness of ± years. Seventy per cent were detected to have a comorbid physical condition. People with dementia commonly have physical comorbidities and symptoms (e.g., pain) that are linked to BPSD such as agitation and delusions.

2 Drug side effects or drug-drug interactions can also contribute to these behaviors. 2 Furthermore, health system interactions (e.g., making appointments) are associated with greater emotional caregiving. Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) can lead to quality of life impacts in not only the individual with dementia, but also others around them.

This module explores the assessment of BPSD using the ABC (antecedent, behaviour, consequence) model, and discusses the management of BPSD using pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods as well as the management of comorbid.

comorbidities in the context of dementia; and the DICE model (Describe, Investigate, Create and Evaluate) as guidance on how to deal with the neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia.

In addition, several states have outlined actions in their state Alzheimer’s disease plans to integrate dementia care into routine ambulatory care.

For. However, the excess risk accounted for by comorbidity could be underestimated, as physical conditions may be underdiagnosed among persons with schizophrenia. 32,40 Because the IRR estimate varied when evaluated for age, civil status, SA, and cerebrovascular disease, these factors seem to modify the association between schizophrenia and dementia.

Depression co-existing with cognitive impairment or dementia has an addictive effect on adverse outcomes for physical health, functional status, and mortality. (5) In a community general hospital, Modrego and Ferrandez (6) found that after a mean period of 3 years, patients with MCI and a clinical diagnosis of depressive disorder were at more.

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